STEP web banner purple

STEP

Resources

In this section you will find useful resources to support you in your job search activities.

The resource pack below provides useful information and advice about job hunting as well as contact details for companies that employ part-time and temporary staff.

Guide to Part Time and Temporary Work

 

Internet & Job Hunting

Universal Jobmatch

Universal Jobmatch is an online service from the Department for Work and Pensions and, as it is open to all jobseekers (regardless of whether or not they are claiming a benefit) it is effectively another major job board. We will look at this site in some detail, as an example of a big job board.

As with most other job boards, jobseekers do not need an account to start searching for a job, but if they do have an account they can post a CV, create a job profile, get updates on jobs that interest them and save search results.

There are two main ways to find jobs on this site. The first is through the Search bar at the top of the page. The second is the Browse jobs feature, located under the location search box.

To search for jobs using the search bar, enter any combination of job title, skills or keywords and a location. Jobseekers do not need to complete all of these search terms. For example, entering childcare in the skills/keywords box and London for location will return jobs asking for skills in childcare in London.

After clicking the Search button, a search will be performed and a Job results page will be displayed. Results can then be narrowed down by distance, posting date (the date the vacancy was first advertised) and job type (part-time or full-time). For example, if a postcode had been entered in the city/county/postcode box, vacancies could be narrowed down to those within the distance selected.

Keywords can be job titles, skills needed for the job, industries (eg Hotel) or specific company names. Universal Jobmatch uses ‘predictive text’ on text entered in the search boxes. For example, if Customer is entered in the job title box, jobs such as Customer Services Adviser and Customer Services Assistant will be suggested. However, it is sometimes best to ignore the suggestions and just enter one word - it might return some jobs that are not of interest, but this is probably better than risking missing some suitable jobs because they had a slightly different job title.

The Browse jobs method of searching is less specific than using the search bar. When you click Browse jobs you will be taken to a page where you can select how you want to browse. However, searches using the Browse jobs options alone tend to result in too many jobs over too wide an area for young jobseekers in a city the size of London.

Young jobseekers are likely to find that using Universal Jobmatch effectively requires a bit of trial and error. For some jobs inputting the exact job title or skill will work, but for others they might need to be a bit less specific and spend the time looking through a longer list.

Apprenticeships

The government’s Apprenticeships website is the main national site for apprenticeship vacancies. Employers are not obliged to advertise vacancies on the site, but there are normally a thousand or more live London vacancies. Not every available opportunity will be listed, but it is by far the most comprehensive site for apprenticeship vacancies.

It is possible to search for vacancies on Find an apprenticeship without registering, but to make an application young people need to create an account.

They will then need to input details including name, date of birth, address, phone number, email address and choose a password. The email address will be used as the username to sign in to your account and will be the address seen by employers.

  • The password must be between 8 and 20 characters long and include a combination of upper and lowercase letters and a number (eg JoeSmith1)
  • Write down the password before it is forgotten
  • Use a sensible email address - inappropriate addresses may put employers off
  • Include a telephone number so training providers and employers can use it to make contact to discuss the application

The account will need to be activated - go into the email account used in the registration form and there will be an email with a 6-character code. This code is needed to activate your account. It might be necessary to check the junk mail folder as sometimes the activation email may be filtered to this folder instead of the inbox.

Once the account is activated and the user has logged on they will see a search box and your account options on the top right of the screen. To start searching for vacancies, enter a key word (such as job role, occupation type) and the location. Select the apprenticeship level and click search.

Using the Browse tab it is possible to search by sector categories. When searching by category, select the broad area of work and then narrow it down to the job role by clicking on the green browse button. This will bring up the category list along with the number of sub-categories within that area of work. For example, in Business Administration and Law, job roles include Accounting, Sales and Telesales and Marketing. Click on Update results after selecting specific job roles.

The search results will include the vacancy title, the employers name, a short description about the vacancy including the closing date and a map showing where the vacancy is and the distance it is from the selected location.

To apply for a vacancy, click on Apply for apprenticeship, this will bring up the application form for the vacancy selected. The contact details will be automatically entered but applicants will need to add:

  • Education details
  • Qualifications
  • Work experience details
  • Three ‘about you’ questions
  • Two additional questions (where employers have asked for more information)

When all sections have been completed click on Preview and Submit or Save draft at the bottom of the page.

Some other websites specifically aimed at young people who are not graduates include:

GetMyFirstJob lists apprenticeship vacancies – not as many vacancies as Find an apprenticeship, but a more flexible search engine.

Not Going to Uni aims to help school and college leavers make informed decisions about their future by showing the opportunities that exist outside of traditional university, such as apprenticeships, sponsored degrees, gap years and jobs.

CareerMap also lists apprenticeships – the Map Search gives a good visual indication of local vacancies.

Employers’ recruitment websites

Almost all larger employers have their own recruitment websites, typically accessed by clicking on Jobs or Careers at the bottom of their home page. Even when a job has been found using a job board or specialist website, applicants will often eventually be directed to the employer’s recruitment page. This may not be the case for smaller employers, but larger organisations will usually want applicants to go through their own system. Apprenticeship Training Providers, who have vacancies with many employers, also often have their own vacancy and recruitment pages (in addition to placing vacancies on sites such as Find an apprenticeship).

There is a lot of variation in the online recruitment system between employers. Some will simply ask applicants to send in a CV, or even come into a store to pick up an application form. For other employers, applicants will go through almost the whole process online, with just the final interview being face-to-face.

As with job boards and apprenticeship vacancy sites, you can search for vacancies without registering but need to register to make an application. The registration system is familiar, with an email address and password needed and a link being sent to the email account to activate.

Having searched for and found a vacancy, clicking on the Apply button begins the process. Applicants then need to input some details about themselves. This is very much an online version of a traditional/paper application form, covering right to work in the UK, contact and personal details, references, employment and education. Applicants can go back and change these details later and they are saved for future applications.

Online tests

Applicants often need to complete a Situational Judgement Test. Tests like this are becoming more and more popular with retailers, who wish to weed out unsuitable candidates early on.

These tests ask you a series of questions based around what the applicant would do in a particular situation, with the results being used as an indicator of their personality or competence. When the employer is looking at personality there are generally no right or wrong answers, with applicants being advised to answer as honestly as possible. When the employer is looking at competency there can be right and wrong answers (or more right and more wrong).

Applicants may also be asked to take numerical and/or verbal reasoning tests, either online or along with an interview if they pass the initial online assessment. Practice can help with reasoning tests and there are some free test practice websites including Cubiks Online Assessment.

 

Useful websites

The biggest list of action verbs and words to use in a cv/resume.

By Andy Jones, Department of English, UC Davis (University of California).

Great advice and tips. Blogs by employers on how to get a job in the financial industry.

Information on writing and distributing CVs and cover letters

UK job site with careers advice and interview, CV and cover letter tips

Vacancies, courses and careers advice for graduates

Covering letters and application forms.

31 tips for writing cover letters

Resumes may get you a job, but your cover letter opens the door. Career Counselor Stephanie Kinkaid gives you tips on how to write a great cover letter.

Guidance on writing effective cover letters

Tips on how to write CVs and cover letters for jobs in various countries.

UK based job site with application and interview tips

A succinct explanation of how to complete an application form properly.

An article to help you write a cover letter that stands out among a sea of applications

Scottish based careers planning and information website, with 600+ job profiles, course information (Scotland) and a range of online tools to help you identify career interests.

Online dictionary of positive words.

Information on CVs and covering letters by graduate website Prospects.

Contains examples as well as good general advice and comments from a range of academics who make admissions decisions.

Contains examples as well as good general advice and comments from a range of academics who make admissions decisions.

Advice on CVs, Cover letters & Interviews

Writing a personal statement, from the online Writing Lab at Purdue University.

        Application letters by the Careers Group.

By Glenn M. Callaghan, Department of Psychology, San Jose State University.

Employability Courses

Circle Collective 5 week course with work experience in Dalston shop along with workshops in social media, networking, jobsearch and guaranteed job interview. https://www.circlecollective.org/training.irs

 City Gateway Employability, Customer Service, Business Admin, Financial Services, Professional services and Fitness training for 16-18 year olds and Book Keeping and IT training for 19-24 year olds (19-24 year olds must be residents of Hackney or other east London boroughs). For more information call 020 3727 6222 or to apply go to http://form.jotformpro.com/form/40784924775973

Generation Arts Future Stage Project Level 3 acting and theatre-making training. 9 month course for 19-25 year-olds those who are not on education, employment or training, or otherwise disadvantaged. Financial support and travel available. Details at www.generationarts.org.uk

 

Employability Courses

Circle Collective 5 week course with work experience in Dalston shop along with workshops in social media, networking, jobsearch and guaranteed job interview. https://www.circlecollective.org/training.irs

 City Gateway Employability, Customer Service, Business Admin, Financial Services, Professional services and Fitness training for 16-18 year olds and Book Keeping and IT training for 19-24 year olds (19-24 year olds must be residents of Hackney or other east London boroughs). For more information call 020 3727 6222 or to apply go to http://form.jotformpro.com/form/40784924775973

Generation Arts Future Stage Project Level 3 acting and theatre-making training. 9 month course for 19-25 year-olds those who are not on education, employment or training, or otherwise disadvantaged. Financial support and travel available. Details at www.generationarts.org.uk

Employability courses

Just IT Work Study Programme with Business Admin and IT Pre-Apprenticeship courses. For further details visit: https://www.justit.co.uk/

London Transport Museum Route into Work pre-employment course for 16-24 year-olds. Includes Level 1 Business & Customer Awareness, lunch is provided and travel is reimbursed. More information at http://www.ltmuseum.co.uk/learning/young-peop2le/route-into-work

Princes Trust Get Started courses for 16-25 year-olds who are not in employment, education or training. Work experience, employability skills and up to 3 months mentoring support. All expenses and travel costs paid, details https://www.princes-trust.org.uk/help-for-young-people/opportunities-near-me?region=South+of+England&programme_name=Get+Started&postcode=London&t=1

SoundSkool free music performance or technology courses with English, maths & personal development for 16-18 year-olds (up to 24 with learning disability), based in Crouch End, enrolling now, details at http://www.soundskool.co.uk/#!courses/c1v27

Spear 6 week employment courses in centres across London for 16-24 year-olds, details at http://spearcourse.org

Street League Employability Programme using football to help 16 to 24 year-olds develop employability skills. Training includes football training, personal development, maths, English and work placement. Training centres in North and South London, more details at http://www.streetleague.co.uk/get-involved/how-to-get-involved/

Trees for Cities 4½ month training and work experience in community gardens across London and at Walworth Garden Farm in Southwark for 18-24 year-olds. Expenses up to £11 per day reimbursed. More information at http://www.treesforcities.org/about-us/training/horticulture-training/